Sunday, October 16, 2011

CVS...Corporate Greed! False advertising! Thumbs nose at Federal Trade Commission!








A few months ago, I penned a post on the tendency of CVS to falsely advertise and engage in deceptive business practices at their outlets in Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Las Vegas.

The report tossed a searing spotlight on the pharmacy's failure to "honor" sale offers, their flagrant disregard for expiration dates on products stocking the shelves, and a piss-poor attitude on the behalf of the sales staff whenever the issues were brought to their attention by concerned shoppers.

Post: 08/31/2010

http://ijulian.blogspot.com/2009/08/cvsretailer-dishonest-about-sale-offers.html

Shortly thereafter, the Federal Trade Commission launched an investigation into CVS's disreputable practices - at which point - a lawsuit was filed against the corporate entity in Los Angeles Superior Court.

CVS settled out-of-court (after being fined upwards of 2 million dollars) without admitting guilt.

Post: 08/22/2011

http://ijulian.blogspot.com/2011/08/cvsfined-2-million-dollars-for.html

In spite of the foregoing, CVS management is still advertising sale prices which they do not intend to "make good" on, and they are also inclined to still offer up coupon deals that are not worth the paper they're printed on.

For example, this past week I spied a beverage on sale priced at a $1.00 for a 12 ounce bottle.

Since I was not familiar with the "product", I decided to give it the old college try!

I plucked one up out of the cooler, then headed for the self check-out counter.

Just as I started to scan the bottle, a CVS employee dashed over to ask me if I'd like a 2nd bottle for free!

Apparently, I had overlooked a neatly-folded coupon tied to the neck of the container, which contained a two-for-one coupon inside.

"Sure," I eagerly responded, as I trotted over to the cooler and snatched up a second bottle in a different flavor.

However, when the woman deftly keyed codes into the cash register, I immediately noticed that the screen reflected a charge of $2.36!

I expressed my indignation right off-the-bat.

"Heh, I wanted the $1.00 deal, Miss," I lamented as politely as I could, as a long line of customers began to snake behind me angrily in the busy store.

Her face flushed for a sec.

Then, after a very pregnant pause, the CVS cashier proceeded to input new data into the cash register to reflect an adjustment.

Bingo!

I strolled away happy with my beverages in hand (the product was labelled "Honest Tea" ironically enough!) but wondered to myself how many shoppers got ripped-off that day at CVS because they didn't notice the overcharge on their receipt?

If 'ya ask me, and in view of what went down, CVS is thumbing their nose at the Federal Trade Commission (and consumers, too).

I guess that the fines they get dinged for breaking the law amounts to mere peanuts when compared to all the cash that flows into the till daily on the heels of their dishonest business maneuvers.

Only in America!

No wonder citizens have taken to the streets in recent days to protest "Corporate Greed".


No comments:

Post a Comment